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Musical Theology: Honey I’m Good

Jonathan Jergens Men, Music, TOB, Young Adult, Youth Ministry Leave a Comment

Time for another musical theology article! My last article was Maroon 5, and I have been using music videos and songs to teach in Faith Formation. The students like them a lot, but it actually gives them time to understand the lyrics and what they are actually singing along to. So I decided to make it a “thing” in class! This time it’s “Honey I’m Good” by Andy Grammar. You can find the lyrics here.

This is an amazing song! The words are amazing – they speak to the desire to resist temptation, strong temptation because there is another “at home” that he cares more about than just a momentary infatuation. The first verse sets the scene perfectly:

It’s been a long night here, and a long night there
And these long, long legs are damn near everywhere
(hold up now)
You look good, I will not lie
But if you ask where I’m staying tonight
I gotta be like oh, baby, no, baby, you got me all wrong, baby
My baby’s already got all of my love

Every man knows that “feeling” when an attractive woman walks by. Especially one that is interested in you! It’s exciting, exhilarating, amazing. There is something spectacular about women, and part of it is in their physical beauty. There is nothing wrong with recognizing that in a woman. There is something wrong when you only see that part of a woman, and nothing else. And as men, we must guard against objectifying women to just how they look – even if they are beautiful. God made them beautiful in more ways than just the physical, or the “long, long legs” as the song describes. It can be difficult to see past that, especially in today’s culture and in women’s fashion choices. However, while it’s a woman’s responsibility to decide what is or isn’t appropriate to wear, it’s our responsibility recognize their physical beauty, but then strive to see past that to who they really are as children of God.

As the verse progresses, a situation develops. The woman, obviously attracted to him, wants to go home with him. However, he isn’t single. It’s the oldest temptation in the world – lust. And it’s everywhere in today’s society. You need not look any further than the millions of husbands sweating it out over the Ashley Madison hack to understand how available another partner is, and how the world views promiscuity when there is a website visited by millions with the slogan “Life is short. Have an affair.” The singer, realizing what is happening, responds:

So nah, nah honey, I’m good
I could have another but I probably should not
I got somebody at home,
And if I stay I might not leave alone
No, honey, I’m good
I could have another but I probably should not
I gotta bid you adieu
To another I will stay true

There is something wrong when you only see beauty in a woman, and nothing else.
The chorus is telling: so much truth in so few words! The first thing he does is to stop. The temptations of lust are further fueled by alcohol, the situation, the environment. The first thing he does is stops drinking. The second thing he does is identify that he is committed to someone else. Next, he leaves.

He recognizes that if he remains in the situation he is in, he “might not leave alone.” In a world rife with sexual permissiveness, most men would laugh or scorn him. The uniquely male “peer pressure” and need to “prove you are a man” by having sex with someone has never been higher. Yet he decides to make the right choice. The second verse is just as telling as the first:

Now better men, than me have failed
Drinking from that unholy grail
(Now check it out)
I got her, and she got me
And you’ve got that ass, but I kindly
Gotta be like oh, baby, no, baby, you got me all wrong, baby
My baby’s already got all of my love

The uniquely male “peer pressure” and need to “prove you are a man” by having sex with someone has never been higher.
This guy knows what is about to happen, because he’s seen it before. Better men have fallen for the temptation. The difference between him and those “better men” is that he makes a concrete choice. He “chooses” to love. Society gets love mixed up with infatuation. St. Thomas said that to love is “to will the good of another.” In this situation, he is willing the good of his partner – it’s a choice. An infatuation is a feeling – an urge. Strong, no doubt, but just that. To choose to not indulge the urge is to say “I choose to love you. I’m free – yet I choose to treat you with respect – to respect our relationship.” Sometimes the choice is an easy one. As the song says, she’s incredibly beautiful, and the temptation is hard to resist.

Life is full of temptations. Taking this song to another more spiritual level, the woman in the song is sin. And sin is always tempting. It’s the easy way, the attraction, the temptation that is almost impossible to resist. Even in the midst of those temptations, we can choose to love God, or to “drink from that unholy grail.” When we choose God, we choose to love Him that created us, who knew us before we were born. It’s a thousand little “Yes’s” to God that brings us closer and closer to Him. But it’s a choice.

What will you choose?

About the Author

Jonathan Jergens

I'm a Catechist and attend St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and St. Ann in Fayetteville, North Carolina. I've been in the military 11 years, and I am stationed at Ft. Bragg.

 

 

 

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About the Author

Jonathan Jergens

I'm a Catechist and attend St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and St. Ann in Fayetteville, North Carolina. I've been in the military 11 years, and I am stationed at Ft. Bragg.